Monthly Archives: September 2011

LTV GTG – SEPTEMBER

LTV GTG – SEPTEMBER

The magnitude of our social problems will require that all citizens and institutions make a commitment to volunteering as a way of life and as a primary opportunity to create needed change…says George Romne.

Monthly get together is a regular feature in the Long Term Volunteering programme facilitated by FSL India. The volunteers are placed on various projects at various locations. Once a month the international volunteers gather together to share their experience, success stories and learning vis-a-vis what they planned to implement and bring about changes in the lives of the target community.

One of the underlying principles of engaging the international youth mass on various projects through voluntary service is to give an international dimension to development interventions and the changes that emanate from the collective actions. Get together indeed facilitates a process whereby the international volunteers learn through sharing with one another. Get together normally spans for two days. It is organised in batches for the international volunteers.

The get together for the month of September 2011 was organized at a Beach Resort at Koteshwara (about 7 kilo metres away from Kundapur) on 15th and 16th September. Although eleven volunteers associated with different project at different location were invited, due to unavoidable circumstances, only six volunteers representing countries such as France, Japan, Austria, Slovakia and Sweden participated in the monthly get together. Three staff from FSL India also participated in the get together were part of the learning process.

The primary objective of organising get together is indeed multi-dimensional. During the two-day sessions, the volunteers had the opportunity to meet with each other. They could share their experiences among each other. It was also an occasion to get and give feedback on their projects. They made assessment of living experience in the host family. As the volunteers work on a range of issues such as education, health, socio-cultural and economic development and environmental issues; they made an assessment on the progress, changes brought about and challenges encountered. Indeed this process created a platform for dialogue and continuous learning.

One of the interesting events took place during the get together is project and host family portrait which the volunteers made through the graphical presentation as shown in the picture above. This was done so as to understand both positive aspects and the challenges encountered. The graphical analysis greatly varied from volunteer to volunteer. However, it was a learning experience and everybody expressed a spirit of enthusiasm of being part of the volunteering experience. Simulation games, sharing of experience, one-to-one talk with coordinator; were also organised for the volunteers.

Visit by Indo – French Management Students

Visit by Indo – French Management Students

A delegation comprised of three business management students from National School of Business, Bangalore and Business School ESC PAU, France paid a visit to learn about youth volunteerism and inter-cultural learning promoted by FSL India. Both these academic institutions have been engaging students in youth exposure activities which help the student community learn from each other. In this effort Ravi Kumar from National School of Business Bangalore was placed at ESC PAU, France. On the other hand Laetitia and Maxime from ESC PAU, France did their youth exposure at National School of Business, Bangalore.

As partial fulfilment of student exposure in pursuance of their academic course, these management trainees are currently working on different business projects for different companies, NGOs and civil society organisation and deal with a range of issues including cultural differences between French and Indian workers. They were overwhelmed by FSL India’s vision to promote world peace, mutual respect and inter-cultural exchange by facilitating international voluntarism among youth in the field of Natural Resource Management and Socio Economic Development of local community.

With the help of a semi-structured questionnaire they wanted to have in-depth understanding about FSL India’s commitment to promote international volunteerism and inter-cultural learning. The delegates had an intensive dialogue with FSL India team represented by Mr. Deepak. They sought information about the working environment and the challenges encountered in promoting international volunteerism and inter-cultural learning. Having known about background information of FSL India, they were inquisitive to learn more about Indo-French team. Indo-French culture and the context in which the volunteers from across the world work together are the important dimensions of the deliberation. The dialogue ultimately aimed at identifying potential challenges and the way forward to address them. Here are the feedbacks from the students:

The interview with FSL India was quite different in various aspects. The work done by the organisation is quite applauding. The way FSL India caters to the needs of volunteers from different nationalities is great too.

I wish FSL India great success in promoting its Vision and have a successful future….Ravi Kumar, from India.

Very interesting interview! New and relevant information, thank you very much… thus says Laetitia MOUSTIE, from France.

Thank you very much for showing your unique experience …says Maxime ZAFIROPOULOS, from France.

FSL India takes this opportunity to wish these management trainees a good future ahead and become the forerunners of promoting world peace, mutual respect and inter-cultural learning.

FSL- Work Camps in August 2011

FSL- Work Camps in August 2011

FSL hosted six work camps in August: Bangalore, Coorg, Kundapur and Kerala in the South and Dharamsala and Kolkata in the North India.

In Bangalore, 12 volunteers from 8 different countries took part in the work camp. They taught the children English, maths, dance, songs, games and awareness of health and hygiene. Volunteers painted the walls and did some educational paintings. They attended a cultural dance programmes, visited local people’s houses and interacted with the locals.

               

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In Kannur, 19 volunteers spent 3 weeks learning yoga, ayurveda, and volunteering in a school. Volunteers taught children English and played games with them. The volunteers had many cultural activities like visiting temples, learning about traditional martial arts and interacting with the locals

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In Dharamsala, 18 volunteers did educational, cultural and construction activities. They worked on a playground, painted the rooms and the toilets walls of the school .They also interacted with the children, Tibetan youth and Tibetan Monk. They also had cultural activities: visiting Dala Lama temple, Bhagsu temple and TCV (Tibetan Children’s Village). On international cooking day, they cooked dishes of their country and shared them with each other. The third week of the work camp they went for trekking.

     

     

     

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In Kolkata, 11 volunteers painted walls and 40 benches and did some educational painting in the school. The volunteers interacted with children and had activities like singing songs and played games of different countries. They also learnt about Indian culture by visiting the local houses and the local women helped them to wear sarees.

    

    

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September: Orientation to the new volunteers

September: Orientation to the new volunteers

As promotion of volunteerism and inter-cultural learning is the heart of the matter and an in important channel for development cooperation, receiving the overseas delegation is the regular phenomenon at FSL India. Every month new volunteers across the world join FSL India and NGO stakeholders for voluntary service and inter-cultural learning.

September 2011, is yet another eventful occasion for FSL India to welcome new volunteers. For as many as 38 volunteers from eight countries arrived in India to begin their long-term voluntary service. As usual prior to the placement of volunteers in different projects, FSL India organised a week-long orientation programme for the new entrants. The orientation programme was organised at Hotel Julie-yo International, Kundapur, between 5th and 11th September 2011. It was facilitated by the LTV Programme team under the direct supervision and guidance of Ms Vanaja the Deputy Director.

The orientation schedule was divided into different parts to meet the participants’ requirements and expectations. On the first day, the volunteers were picked-up from the meeting point and brought to the venue of orientation. On the same day afternoon volunteers went round Kundapur to get familiarised with the township. In the first part of the orientation which started on Tuesday the 6th September 2011, the volunteers were welcomed in a typical Indian style of garlanding and application of vermilion Tilak (mark) on forehead and turmeric talcum on the cheeks followed by the Aarathi (in which light from wicks soaked in ghee (purified butter) or camphor is offered to a deity and human being with a symbolic gesture of worship and dispelling evils).

By and large morning and afternoon sessions were structured so as to orient and give theoretical input to the participants on introduction to Indian life, philosophy, roles and responsibilities, setting up aims and objectives and conflict management. The evening sessions were facilitated mostly to introduce the volunteers on Indian culture and interaction with community people. The local girls and women organised Henna decoration for the girls at Hotel, Yakshagan on Friday evening. Three hours of Kannada language class, project introduction and visit to the social and development projects were also the important features of the orientation. Volunteers actively participated in different sessions, presentations and group activities. Eventually, on the last day of the orientation an excursion was organised for the volunteers. Here are the volunteers who participated in the orientation:

NoCountryFirst NameSurnameProject/Placed
1CanadaBridgid AnneLeclercAccept society, Bangalore
2USASchmitiMandiNisarga, Hunsur
3FranceAmandinaBouhourNallurpala School, Hunsur
4PortugalMariena ErpisNallurpala School, Hunsur
5FranceBaptistePecqueurParaspara Trust (Transit Home), Bangalore
6FranceBenjaminWoutsParaspara Trust (Tent School), Bangalore
7JapanSokiNagaiSea Turtle, Kundapur
8GermanySarahZahnSamarthanam Trust (Parisara), Bangalore
9GermanyLorna CharlottePrilopKishkinda Trust, Hampi
10GermanyAaronEiseleSeon Ashram, Belthangady
11GermanyJohannaWietschelSWORD, Jamakhandi
12GermanyJakobBenischWater Literacy Foundation, Bangalore
13GermanyArjun BrueckWe-Kit, Bangalore
14GermanyJohan SaelensWater Literacy Foundation, Bangalore
15GermanyJulia MuellerMainzSandip Special School, Sulia
16GermanyKatharinaLeitnerSandip Special School, Sulia
17GermanyLea KnaftMercede, Mangalore
18GermanyLisa IsabellaArtmaierParaspara Trust (Tent School), Bangalore
19GermanyTim FerberWe-Kit, Bangalore
20GermanyViktoriaKwasniokTent School, Kundapur
21GermanyJohanna KrugerAccept society, Bangalore
22GermanyJosefineGrabenhorstSneha Special School, Bhatkal
23GermanyNilsMüllerSt.Michle’s School, Bangalore
24GermanyAnna HolzWe-Kit, Bangalore
25GermanyFriederikaJustSt.Michle’s School, Bangalore
26GermanyBettineDiepenthalSAMA Foundation, Bangalore
27GermanyMeretHesseTent School, Kundapur
28GermanyJohannes      Reuter Vagjothi, Ampar
29GermanyMariaSchubertChaithanya, Kundapur
30GermanyLarissaSprickHosadu School, Kundapur
31GermanyJuliaSwiederSea turtle/Eco tourism, Kundapur
32GermanyLouisavan den BoschKanchugodu School, Kundapur
33GermanyGesaWallheinkeManasa rehabilitation, Udupi
34GermanyLeonieWillicksUPMZ School, Brahmavar
35GermanyVerenaWildKanasina Shale, Kundapur
36MexicoClaudia YvonneLiñan SeguraTent School, Kundapur
37DenmarkMarian BejstrupStrangeSneha Special School, Bhatkal
38GermanyJanna MariaHorschSWORD, Jamakhandi

Case Study on Kitchen Garden at Keevalur Anganwadi – Chennai

Case Study on Kitchen Garden at Keevalur Anganwadi – Chennai
Place:Keevalur
Beneficiary:Children of Anganwadi (early childhood development and care centre)
Plants available:Drumstick tree, Papaya Tree, Banana tree, Shadow Tree, Goa tree, Beans, Green leaves and okra.

Kitchen Garden:

Vegetables and fruits occupy an important place in our daily life. They are the only source to increase not only the nutritive values of foods but also its palatability. Considering this as an important aspect of healthy living, a family or an institute should have plans to produce its own requirements in the backyards using the available fresh water as well as the kitchen and bathroom wastewater. This will not only facilitate prevention of stagnation of unused water which will be hazardous to our health through environmental pollution, but can also be useful for successful production of requirement of vegetables and fruits.

 The Kitchen Garden at Keevalur Anganwadi was launched with the efforts of FSL India and Korean volunteers during the Fifth Happy Move Camp. Considering the nutritional food requirements of the children at the Anganwadi Centre, the Kitchen Garden was initiated. It is maintained by the Anganwadi teacher along with the help of an assistant who prepares supplementary nutritional feed for the children. Now the Kitchen Garden started producing vegetables and fruits and 30 children at the Anganwadi Centre are immensely benefitted from this endeavour.

 Prior to the Kitchen Garden came in to being, the place was lying deserted and no one could ever thought of making use of this land. However, after FSL India started working in this village, the staff and volunteers planned to make use of this land for Kitchen Garden so that vegetables and fruits grown in the garden will be consumed by the children. With varieties of fruit bearing and vegetable plants, the surrounding looks green. The benefits are of many folds. Some of them can be enumerated as follows:

Benefits of Kitchen Garden:

  • Children get nutritious food with greens and vegetables from the Kitchen Garden which in turn helps improving their nutritional status.
  • Consumption of required amount of Green leaves, spinach and other vegetables impact largely to attain and improve age appropriate growth and development of children. Prevalence of vitamin and iron deficiency related diseases among children will be reduced gradually. Children are also given fruits like banana which has the high content of nutritive values.
  • Looking at this the community people are being motivated to start their own kitchen garden and unused land is brought under vegetable cultivation.
  • With this effort wastewater is being reused which in turn helps in prevention of breeding of mosquitos.

The community people are quite encouraged to see the Kitchen Garden and very happy to witness how their children are fed with organically cultivated vegetables and fruits. With the Kitchen Garden, the Anganwadi Centre is environmentally healthy and child-friendly. Children take time to go around the kitchen garden and are inculcated with value of safe and green environment which is pre-requisite for human existence. Anganwadi Centre is able to save money by growing vegetables and fruits. The expense has been curtailed and self-sufficiency is gradually achieved.

Case Study on Kitchen Garden at Thandalam Anganwadi – Chennai

Case Study on Kitchen Garden at Thandalam Anganwadi – Chennai
Place:Thandalam
Beneficiary:Children of Anganwadi (early childhood development and care centre)
Plants available:Citrus fruit tree, Drumstick tree, Papaya Tree, Sapodilla (Chikoo) Tree, Banana tree, Shadow Tree, Guava tree and vegetables such as Beans, Green Leaves, spinach and Brinjal.

Kitchen Garden:

Promotion of kitchen garden is one of the initiatives of FSL India Happy Move Camp. Kitchen Garden which was initiated about one year ago at Thandalam by FSL India Happy Move Camp has emerged as an important feature of the Anganwadi Centre. With varieties of fruit bearing trees and vegetable plants all around, the garden looks unique. All these useful plants and vegetation have certainly doubled the beauty of the Anganwadi Centre. It is maintained well by the Anganwadi Teacher and the maid who prepares supplementary feed for the children. The maid regularly waters the garden twice a day which helps trees and vegetation grow faster. Here are some of the benefits of Kitchen Garden:

  • Children are regularly fed with nutritious food with greens and vegetables from the garden. No doubt this will make far-reaching contribution for improving the nutritional status of children.
  • Green leaves, spinach and other vegetables are being used for preparing vegetable dish which is served to the children every day along with the rice. Intake of adequate quantity of vegetables would improve the health status and balanced growth of children. Vitamin and iron deficiency related diseases among the children will be reduced considerably.
  • Once the fruit bearing trees starts bearing fruits, children will have adequate fruits seasonally in the Anganwadi Centre which will ensure healthy living.
  • Besides making vegetable dish from the beans, okra, chilly etc. seeds are also preserved for vegetable cultivation.
  • Water being the scarce resource, wastewater from the kitchen is recycled and reused. Through a small drainage, the waste water is being drained out and used for irrigation of plants and trees in the kitchen garden. This further prevented stagnation and water-log and breeding of mosquitoes. This is a good initiative to prevent vector-borne diseases in the community.
  • This initiative generated interest among the parents who are motivated to initiate kitchen garden and backyard cultivation.

Feedback from the beneficiary Community:

  1. Fifty-two year old one Ms. Gunasundary says the Kitchen Garden is very useful for the Anganwadi Center. Earlier Anganwadi Center used to buy vegetables from the shop. Whereas now vegetables are grown in the kitchen Garden. This has ensured a greater degree of self-sufficiency. Vegetable cultivation for domestic consumption is indeed a laudable effort.
  1. Ms. Vijaya from the community opines that such kind of initiative also will have long term impact on pollution control measures. Anganwadi Centre is located near the road and due to vehicular emission there has been air pollution. Such initiatives would not only ensure disease prevention and healthy living but also promote ecology and prevent environment degradation. Kitchen Garden at the Anganwadi Centre promoted by FSL-India Happy Move Camp will serve as the model for the village community to replicate.

Rescued Sea-Turtle Released…

Rescued Sea-Turtle Released…

On 7th August we found an adult female Olive Ridley turtle at Kanchugodu village. It was badly injured with front left flipper missing and a deep cut on its rear flipper. Considering rough and high tide in sea we kept the turtle with Daasi Kharvy for care and treatment. We tried to release it to sea couple of times but it couldn’t cross the high waves due to heavy rain. We visited the nearby fishing village of fishermen and asked for help so that fishermen can take this turtle and leave it in the deep sea. Fortunately on 28th August sea was calm than the other days at Maravanthe. Dasi swam with turtle about 20 meters from the shore helping it to cross the waves. Our rescue action was successful when the turtle managed to cross the waves returned to the sea.

FSL-Work Camps in July 2011

FSL-Work Camps in July 2011

In the month of July, FSL hosted 10 work camps in different parts of India including bilateral camps. Four work camps were bilateral camps. Eighty two volunteers from eighteen different countries took part in these work camps.

In Kudapur, 14 volunteers worked for 2 weeks in a school. They painted the walls of the school and did some educational paintings. Planted trees, made trash bins and educated the children about awareness of Sea turtle. Volunteers made presentations about their culture to the children and among themselves. They also learnt about Indian culture by visiting the local houses, a Hindu temple and they painted their hands with Henna.

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In Pondicherry, 5 volunteers did construction activities like shifted stones, sand, bricks and   mixed cement and helped mason. They have cleaned and painted the walls and also did some activities with the children like singing songs and playing games of different countries. They conducted sport, dance, drawing competition for children. They also visited local places of interest like a temple, a beach and a market.

           

             

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Rajasthan – Mount Abu was another place where FSL conducted a work camp to help a school. Seventeen volunteers did educational drawings, taught the children about the awareness health and hygiene and had various activities with the school students. They also learnt about Indian culture by visiting the local houses, a Hindu temple and attended Hindu wedding.  They also painted their hands with Henna.

           

           

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In Dharamsala, 20 volunteers participated from different countries worked in the school for 2 weeks and one week was trekking. The volunteers did educational, cultural and construction activities. They rebuilt a wall and made playground, did educational paintings and learn about Tibetan culture. They also interacted with the children, Tibetan youth and Tibetan Monk. The cultural program included a visit to the Dalai Lama temple, Bagru temple and waterfall. On international cooking day, they cooked dishes of their country and shared them with each other

           

           

            

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Bilateral Work Camps

In Mysore, Bangalore and Kundapur, FSL held work camps exclusively for volunteers from two of our South Korean partner organizations. The volunteers taught English, games, origami and educated the children about hygiene and also planted plants. They conducted sport, dance, and drawing Competitions for the children. They did educational paintings about environment and hygiene, painted walls, blackboards, toilet walls and pillars of the school.  The volunteers worked in the garden and play ground. On international cooking day, they cooked dishes of their country and shared with the children. They also learnt about Indian culture by visiting the local houses and they painted their hands with Henna. The volunteers did an extensive tour of historical locations to learn about Indian history and culture.

          

            

          

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Cultural Event at Kota Highschool

Cultural Event at Kota Highschool

An intense sound of drums, music and song were welcoming us when we reached the tent where a show was performed for an excited crowd. The air under the roof where we sat was hot and humid and you could feel the excitement in the air. Every year a competition takes place between different classes of Sri Lakshmi Bangera college in Kota where the classes perform a 30 minutes show each to win the first prize. In front of us the students performed dances in beautiful dresses. Some dances were traditional and typical for Karnataka, like the dance with sticks which they were clapping together and some dances were performed to popular dance music. There was also different dramas played; a popular theme was to show a united India where all different people and religions stand up together against terrorism.

Another popular play was the “Yakshagana”, a play that is very popular in coastal Karnataka. The actor in the Yakshagana wears a colorful costume and a masks and were dancing and singing. An important thing seems to be the special mimic that the actor show which was also sometimes very entertaining! After a whole day of entertainment we were impressed by all the costumes, creations and performances that must have taken a long time to prepare and practice and half deaf (because of the loud music) and happy we went back.

 Maria, LTV in Eco Tourism